***********************************************************
ORGANIZING PLAIN & SIMPLE MONTHLY
JULY/AUGUST 2003

***********************************************************
ORGANIZING PLAIN & SIMPLE MONTHLY
JULY/AUGUST 2003

Tips & Inspiration for Organizing a Simpler Life

***********************************************************
“I try to take one day at a time, but sometimes several days attack me at once.”
–Ashleigh Brilliant

**********************************************************
FEATURE ARTICLE: Organizing storage areas (basement, attic, garage, shed)

Should you store things you are not using in the basement, attic, garage, or shed?

Careful. . .this is a trick question! If you are not using things, why are you storing them at all?

Okay, some things need to be put into storage because they are used seasonally. I’m thinking of ski equipment, bicycles, holiday decorations, and seasonal clothing, for example.

And some things such as gardening tools, power tools and ladders simply aren’t suited for storage in your living quarters. What doesn’t belong in storage are things that should really be trashed, donated or sold.

Now, back to the original question: Should you store things in the basement, attic, garage, or shed? Base your decision on climate and accessibility.

Easy accessibility makes a garage or shed ideal for storing frequently used items such as lawn, garden, and snow removal equipment. Basements also generally allow easy access to stored items. But basements tend to be very humid, which creates a breeding ground for mold and mildew that can damage clothing and furniture.

So unless you have a heat- and humidity-controlled basement, don’t store anything directly on the floor. Place everything on shelves or pallets. If flooding is a possibility, you might want to store everything in watertight plastic tubs instead of cardboard boxes. Because the attic is typically the least accessible storage place, limit attic storage to things you need to access only occasionally, such as holiday decorations and tax records.

Regardless of where you store items, contain like things in boxes or plastic bins and label boxes using a wide felt tip marker. Store boxes and bins with labels facing out so you can find what you’re looking for without having to move heavy boxes.

Store things you use only once a year or less in the back of your storage area. Store items you need to access more frequently in the front or on top. Now, if you really want to get organized, you can tape an itemized list of the contents to the front of the box. You can even take that idea one step further.

Number each box and keep a master index on your computer that includes the box number, list of contents, and location of the box. If you need to retrieve an item, use the “Find” feature in your word processing program to search for and locate the box you need.

Off-site storage should be a last resort. If you are currently renting storage space, think carefully about the items you are storing. Is it really worth the money to store this stuff Or could you get rid of some or most or even all of it?

Periodically, sort through items in your storage areas and reevaluate what you really need to keep. Ask yourself: What’s the worst possible thing that could happen if I just got rid of this?

The biggest reason why we hold on to things we aren’t using is because we think we might need them someday. Ask yourself: Could I borrow or buy another one of these if I do need it someday? In most cases, the answer is yes, so you can give your permission to let the item go.

NEXT MONTH’S FEATURE ARTICLE: The bright side of clutter

***********************************************************
DID YOU KNOW?

If your personal time is “cluttered” with telemarketing calls, now there is something you can do about it.

Go to the National Do Not Call Registry (www.donotcall.gov) and register your home and mobile phone numbers for free. Your registration will be effective for five years.

If you register before August 31, 2003, most telemarketers (see exception below) must stop calling by October 1, 2003. If you register after August 21, you will need to allow
three months for your registration to become effective. You may still receive calls from political organizations, charities, telephone surveyors or companies with which you have an existing business relationship. These callers are not restricted.

You can also register by calling toll-free 1-888-382-1222. That number will be operational nationwide (U.S.) by July 7, 2003. You must call from the telephone number that you
wish to register.

Meanwhile, when you get an unsolicited telemarketing call, ask to be put on that company’s “Do Not Call” list. Very nicely say, “I do not accept telemarketing solicitation. Please take me off your list.” And the caller will very nicely hang up.

***********************************************************
SURVEY RESULTS:

Last month, I asked “What organizing tool do you use regularly to remember routine auto and home maintenance tasks?” As promised, here are the results of that survey:

50% said: Paper calendar or date book
0% said: Electronic calendar (PDA) only
12.5% said: Paper and electronic calendar or date book
31.5% said: Memory alone
6.3% said: Concurrent events (Ex. Change air conditioning
filter on the first of every month)
0% said: Other (please specify in your response)
0% said: I don’t use any type of reminder system

***********************************************************
NEW SURVEY: If getting organized could “buy” you an extra hour every week, where would you most likely spend that additional time? Please select one:

1)With family and/or friends
2)At work
3)Pursuing a hobby or interest
4)Exercising or weight loss activities
5)Learning a new skill/taking a class
6)Rest and relaxation
7)Redecorating or remodeling
8)Other (please specify)

TO RESPOND TO THE SURVEY, do not “Reply” to this message, because I won’t get your response. Please send an e-mail message to me at donna@unclutter.com with the word “Survey”
in the subject line.

I will share the results of this survey in the next issue.

***********************************************************
READERS WRITE:

Q. I am changing my ways of purchasing; asking questions like, “Do I really need this?”, collecting tons of my clothing (and other articles) and giving them to the Salvation Army (Good Will, Viet Nam vets, etc.). Our house is STILL a mess. My husband (and I DO love him), is working at cross purposes with me. He is a clutterer to the max. He’s a shopper and brings home stuff that we don’t use, or don’t even need. I get a stomachache when I come home from work.  There’s stuff everywhere. Actually, I hate going home. I got in touch with Mike Nelson, author of “Don’t Let Clutter Steal Your Life,” and have started a ClutterLess Support Group in my area. I SEEM to be doing all the right things, but the good results just aren’t happening. It’s literally making me sick. Help.

A. You ARE doing all the right things to unclutter your home and life… and you should be proud of yourself. You’re thinking twice about purchases and donating things you no longer love or use. You’ve also reached out for help… and you’re helping others by starting a support group. I think you are awesome!

You do realize, of course, that your home didn’t get cluttered overnight. And sadly, it is difficult to undo years of cluttering in a few days, weeks, or even months. So you’ve got to keep at it!

Try not to focus on how things look today, but instead focus on what you are doing about it. And stay focused. It’s possible that you can’t see results because you are doing a little here and a little there. If you unclutter one room, one drawer and one shelf at a time, you will see more immediate results of your labor and that will help to keep you motivated.

Now, I am going to offer a few suggestions for dealing with your husband (the clutterer) and for making your home a place that you want to come home to.

1)Ask your husband not to buy anything for you unless you have specifically asked for it. Let him know that you appreciate his generous spirit, but that right now, you are trying to get rid of things, not acquire more. Hopefully, that will reduce the volume of stuff he brings home somewhat.

2)Try to create a place for new acquisitions right away. When your husband brings home something new, ask him where he is going to put it. You may need to help him find a place for it. It’s worth your time and effort to do this, because if the new thing has a place, then it’s less likely
to end up just anywhere.

Also, you might try keeping a basket or large tote bag in every room where you can put stuff that’s been left out, so you don’t have to look at it. If your husband asks if you’ve seen a particular thing, you can say “It’s in the basket by the door. Do you think we could find a home for it?”

3. Create a clutter-free zone for yourself. Pick a room or even just a space in your home and begin to unclutter it. Then declare that room or space off limits to clutter.

Explain to your husband (and any other family members) that you need to have at least this one space in your home where you can relax without being surrounded by clutter.

Establish a couple of rules for that room: a) If you bring it in with you, take it out with you. And b) If you take it out while you’re in here, put it away before leaving here. It’s really not too much to ask.

4. Keep in mind that while you can’t directly change anyone’s else behavior, you can indirectly change it by changing your own behavior. Over the first few weeks, you may need to gently remind your husband daily that you are serious about your requests and that it really means a lot
to you. If that doesn’t work, find out from him what one thing you could do for him in exchange for your request and make a deal.

EDITOR’S NOTE: In her letter, the reader mentioned ClutterLess Recovery Groups, Inc. (www.clutterless.org),
which is a nonprofit self-help organization for clutterers by clutterers. Other support groups include Messies Anonymous (www.messies.com) and the National Study Group on Chronic Disorganization
(www.nsgcd.org)

***********************************************************
SHAMELESS PROMOTION: Upcoming media tour

I met some wonderfully organized (and soon-to-be more organized) people on my June Book Tour through Seattle, Portland, Salt Lake City, Minneapolis, Milwaukee and
Madison.

In July, I’m on the road again, demonstrating organization tips for the college-bound student. Catch me if you can!

7/4/03 Hartford CT, WVIT (NBC) Morning News 9-10 a.m.
7/5/03 Detroit MI, WDIV (ABC) Morning News 8-9 a.m.
7/6/03 Dallas TX, WFAA (ABC) Good Morning Texas 8-9 a.m.
7/7/03 Washington DC, WTTG (FOX) Morning News 7-8 a.m.
7/8/03 Chicago IL, WGN (WB) Morning News 7:50 a.m.
7/9/03 Minneapolis MN, KARE (NBC) Today 10-11 a.m.
7/10/03 New York NY, WNYW (FOX) Mid Day 11:45 a.m.
7/11/03 Tampa FL, WFLA (NBC) Daytime 10-11 a.m.
7/12/03 Philadelphia PA, KYW (CBS) Weekend 6-7 a.m.

I will also be in Los Angeles and San Francisco in mid-July or early August. Once dates and times are confirmed, they will be posted at Unclutter.com under “Seminars & Events.”

***********************************************************
Organizing for the College-Bound

If you have a student who is heading off to college for the first time, guess what? You’re about to discover a whole new set of organizational challenges.

How will you transport stuff from Point A (home) to Point B (school)? How will you be able to fit all that stuff into a tiny dorm room? And what can you do to help your student
stay organized while away from home? Following are some excellent tips from students and parents who have been there, done that.

*Use the college-provided checklist as a guideline for what to bring. Highlight those items you need to buy. You may decide to buy some items at a department store near the college rather than buying and transporting them from home. If money is tight, consider shopping at summer garage sales.

*Invest in a set of bed elevators (approximately $15) to create instant storage space under the bed for seasonal bedding and clothes, shoes, extra school supplies, or an inflatable air mattress for overnight guests. Bed elevators are a convenient alternative to cement blocks, which many
students use for this purpose. Look for this product at stores like Bed, Bath & Beyond (www.bedbathandbeyond.com)
and Organize-Everything (www.organize-everything.com).

*For under-the-bed storage, any large, lidded plastic container will do, but for easy access to stored goods, look for under-bed storage boxes with hinged lids and wheels. Vacuum-seal storage bags are an excellent space-saving alternative to boxes assuming, of course, that your student has a vacuum cleaner with a hose attachment. Check out the Hoover Fold Away (www.hoover.com). It’s a full size vacuum cleaner that folds down to a portable size for easy
storage and there are no bags to change!

*Double hanging space in a closet with a second rod that hangs below the existing rod. Use the backs of doors for things like an over-the-door rack with hooks for hanging bathrobe, towels, laundry bag or for an over-the door shoe bag.

*Use sturdy, stackable crates for transporting items; then use the crates to create storage bookshelves, a TV or stereo stand, or even a seat.

*Don’t forget the little things like zippered plastic bags (great for storing open food and for pre-measuring laundry soap powder); non-adhesive shelf liner like the ones from Duck Products (www.duckproducts.com); poster putty for hanging/re-hanging posters and photos without marring walls; and a “care” package of room cleaning supplies, paper towels, and sponges.

*Of course, you can’t let your student leave home without some cash. AOL (www.aol.com) is getting ready to introduce a prepaid card that allows parents and students up-to-the-minute online access to account balances plus the ability to monitor how and where money is being spent. AOL’s cash card will be part of its 9.0 Optimized Version due out later this summer.

*Another new product that’s worth a look is the TI-83 Plus calculator (http://education.ti.com) from Texas Instruments. It’s one of the most powerful graphing calculators on the market today and it comes pre-loaded with an electronic calendar, address book and task list. So students can track assignments and due dates, plus keep track of their active social lives. This handy little
device from Texas Instruments can even serve as an organizational study tool with an electronic flash card application. Students can test themselves on various subjects including foreign languages, vocabulary,geography, history and more. Cool.

***********************************************************
ENTER TO WIN an autographed copy of my most recent book!

Do you have a question about uncluttering or organizing?
Or a really great organizing tip that you would like to share with other readers? Send an e-mail to me at donna@unclutter.com with “Readers_Write” in the subject line. (NOTE: Please do not “Reply” to this message as I will not receive your e-mail.)

If your question or tip is used in a future issue of this newsletter, I will send you a free autographed copy of my latest book, Organizing Plain & Simple
(www.unclutter.com/books.html)!

Congratulations to this month’s winner, Pam S. of Cohocton, NY for her question about how to cope with being overwhelmed with clutter and a spouse who is “working at cross-purposes.”

***********************************************************
That’s it for this month. Until next month, keep it simple.

***********************************************************

 

Tips & Inspiration for
Organizing a Simpler Life

***********************************************************
“I try to take one day at a time, but sometimes several
days attack me at once.”
–Ashleigh Brilliant

**********************************************************
FEATURE ARTICLE: Organizing storage areas (basement, attic,
garage, shed)

Should you store things you are not using in the basement,
attic, garage, or shed?

Careful. . .this is a trick question! If you are not using
things, why are you storing them at all?

Okay, some things need to be put into storage because they
are used seasonally. I’m thinking of ski equipment,
bicycles, holiday decorations, and seasonal clothing, for
example.

And some things such as gardening tools, power tools and
ladders simply aren’t suited for storage in your living
quarters. What doesn’t belong in storage are things that
should really be trashed, donated or sold.

Now, back to the original question: Should you store things
in the basement, attic, garage, or shed? Base your decision
on climate and accessibility.

Easy accessibility makes a garage or shed ideal for storing
frequently used items such as lawn, garden, and snow
removal equipment. Basements also generally allow easy
access to stored items. But basements tend to be very
humid, which creates a breeding ground for mold and mildew
that can damage clothing and furniture.

So unless you have a heat- and humidity-controlled
basement, don’t store anything directly on the floor.
Place everything on shelves or pallets. If flooding is a
possibility, you might want to store everything in
watertight plastic tubs instead of cardboard boxes.

Because the attic is typically the least accessible storage
place, limit attic storage to things you need to access
only occasionally, such as holiday decorations and tax
records.

Regardless of where you store items, contain like things in
boxes or plastic bins and label boxes using a wide felt tip
marker. Store boxes and bins with labels facing out so you
can find what you’re looking for without having to move
heavy boxes.

Store things you use only once a year or less in the back
of your storage area. Store items you need to access more
frequently in the front or on top.

Now, if you really want to get organized, you can tape an
itemized list of the contents to the front of the box. You
can even take that idea one step further.

Number each box and keep a master index on your computer
that includes the box number, list of contents, and
location of the box. If you need to retrieve an item, use
the “Find” feature in your word processing program to
search for and locate the box you need.

Off-site storage should be a last resort. If you are
currently renting storage space, think carefully about the
items you are storing. Is it really worth the money to
store this stuff Or could you get rid of some or most or
even all of it?

Periodically, sort through items in your storage areas and
reevaluate what you really need to keep. Ask yourself:
What’s the worst possible thing that could happen if I just
got rid of this?

The biggest reason why we hold on to things we aren’t using
is because we think we might need them someday. Ask
yourself: Could I borrow or buy another one of these if I
do need it someday? In most cases, the answer is yes, so
you can give your permission to let the item go.

NEXT MONTH’S FEATURE ARTICLE: The bright side of clutter

***********************************************************
DID YOU KNOW?

If your personal time is “cluttered” with telemarketing
calls, now there is something you can do about it.

Go to the National Do Not Call Registry (www.donotcall.gov)
and register your home and mobile phone numbers for free.
Your registration will be effective for five years.

If you register before August 31, 2003, most telemarketers
(see exception below) must stop calling by October 1, 2003.
If you register after August 21, you will need to allow
three months for your registration to become effective.

You may still receive calls from political organizations,
charities, telephone surveyors or companies with which you
have an existing business relationship. These callers are
not restricted.

You can also register by calling toll-free 1-888-382-1222.
That number will be operational nationwide (U.S.) by July
7, 2003. You must call from the telephone number that you
wish to register.

Meanwhile, when you get an unsolicited telemarketing call,
ask to be put on that company’s “Do Not Call” list. Very
nicely say, “I do not accept telemarketing solicitation.
Please take me off your list.” And the caller will very
nicely hang up.

***********************************************************
SURVEY RESULTS:

Last month, I asked “What organizing tool do you use
regularly to remember routine auto and home maintenance
tasks?” As promised, here are the results of that survey:

50% said: Paper calendar or date book
0% said: Electronic calendar (PDA) only
12.5% said: Paper and electronic calendar or date book
31.5% said: Memory alone
6.3% said: Concurrent events (Ex. Change air conditioning
filter on the first of every month)
0% said: Other (please specify in your response)
0% said: I don’t use any type of reminder system

***********************************************************
NEW SURVEY: If getting organized could “buy” you an extra
hour every week, where would you most likely spend that
additional time? Please select one:

1)With family and/or friends
2)At work
3)Pursuing a hobby or interest
4)Exercising or weight loss activities
5)Learning a new skill/taking a class
6)Rest and relaxation
7)Redecorating or remodeling
8)Other (please specify)

TO RESPOND TO THE SURVEY, do not “Reply” to this message,
because I won’t get your response. Please send an e-mail
message to me at donna@unclutter.com with the word “Survey”
in the subject line.

I will share the results of this survey in the next issue.

***********************************************************
READERS WRITE:

Q. I am changing my ways of purchasing; asking questions
like, “Do I really need this?”, collecting tons of my
clothing (and other articles) and giving them to the
Salvation Army (Good Will, Viet Nam vets, etc.). Our house
is STILL a mess. My husband (and I DO love him), is working
at cross purposes with me. He is a clutterer to the
max. He’s a shopper and brings home stuff that we don’t
use, or don’t even need. I get a stomachache when I come
home from work.  There’s stuff everywhere. Actually, I hate
going home. I got in touch with Mike Nelson, author of
“Don’t Let Clutter Steal Your Life,” and have started a
ClutterLess Support Group in my area. I SEEM to be doing
all the right things, but the good results just aren’t
happening. It’s literally making me sick. Help.

A. You ARE doing all the right things to unclutter your
home and life… and you should be proud of yourself.
You’re thinking twice about purchases and donating things
you no longer love or use. You’ve also reached out for
help… and you’re helping others by starting a support
group. I think you are awesome!

You do realize, of course, that your home didn’t get
cluttered overnight. And sadly, it is difficult to undo
years of cluttering in a few days, weeks, or even months.
So you’ve got to keep at it!

Try not to focus on how things look today, but instead
focus on what you are doing about it. And stay focused.
It’s possible that you can’t see results because you are
doing a little here and a little there. If you unclutter
one room, one drawer and one shelf at a time, you will see
more immediate results of your labor and that will help to
keep you motivated.

Now, I am going to offer a few suggestions for dealing with
your husband (the clutterer) and for making your home a
place that you want to come home to.

1)Ask your husband not to buy anything for you unless you
have specifically asked for it. Let him know that you
appreciate his generous spirit, but that right now, you are
trying to get rid of things, not acquire more. Hopefully,
that will reduce the volume of stuff he brings home
somewhat.

2)Try to create a place for new acquisitions right away.
When your husband brings home something new, ask him where
he is going to put it. You may need to help him find a
place for it. It’s worth your time and effort to do this,
because if the new thing has a place, then it’s less likely
to end up just anywhere.

Also, you might try keeping a basket or large tote bag in
every room where you can put stuff that’s been left out, so
you don’t have to look at it. If your husband asks if
you’ve seen a particular thing, you can say “It’s in the
basket by the door. Do you think we could find a home for
it?”

3. Create a clutter-free zone for yourself. Pick a room or
even just a space in your home and begin to unclutter
it. Then declare that room or space off limits to clutter.

Explain to your husband (and any other family members) that
you need to have at least this one space in your home where
you can relax without being surrounded by clutter.

Establish a couple of rules for that room: a) If you bring
it in with you, take it out with you. And b) If you take it
out while you’re in here, put it away before leaving here.
It’s really not too much to ask.

4. Keep in mind that while you can’t directly change
anyone’s else behavior, you can indirectly change it by
changing your own behavior. Over the first few weeks, you
may need to gently remind your husband daily that you are
serious about your requests and that it really means a lot
to you. If that doesn’t work, find out from him what one
thing you could do for him in exchange for your request and
make a deal.

EDITOR’S NOTE: In her letter, the reader mentioned
ClutterLess Recovery Groups, Inc. (www.clutterless.org),
which is a nonprofit self-help organization for
clutterers by clutterers. Other support groups include
Messies Anonymous (www.messies.com) and the
National Study Group on Chronic Disorganization
(www.nsgcd.org)

***********************************************************
SHAMELESS PROMOTION: Upcoming media tour

I met some wonderfully organized (and soon-to-be more
organized) people on my June Book Tour through Seattle,
Portland, Salt Lake City, Minneapolis, Milwaukee and
Madison.

In July, I’m on the road again, demonstrating organization
tips for the college-bound student. Catch me if you can!

7/4/03 Hartford CT, WVIT (NBC) Morning News 9-10 a.m.
7/5/03 Detroit MI, WDIV (ABC) Morning News 8-9 a.m.
7/6/03 Dallas TX, WFAA (ABC) Good Morning Texas 8-9 a.m.
7/7/03 Washington DC, WTTG (FOX) Morning News 7-8 a.m.
7/8/03 Chicago IL, WGN (WB) Morning News 7:50 a.m.
7/9/03 Minneapolis MN, KARE (NBC) Today 10-11 a.m.
7/10/03 New York NY, WNYW (FOX) Mid Day 11:45 a.m.
7/11/03 Tampa FL, WFLA (NBC) Daytime 10-11 a.m.
7/12/03 Philadelphia PA, KYW (CBS) Weekend 6-7 a.m.

I will also be in Los Angeles and San Francisco in mid-July
or early August. Once dates and times are confirmed, they
will be posted at Unclutter.com under “Seminars & Events.”

***********************************************************
Organizing for the College-Bound

If you have a student who is heading off to college for the
first time, guess what? You’re about to discover a whole
new set of organizational challenges.

How will you transport stuff from Point A (home) to Point B
(school)? How will you be able to fit all that stuff into a
tiny dorm room? And what can you do to help your student
stay organized while away from home?

Following are some excellent tips from students and parents
who have been there, done that.

*Use the college-provided checklist as a guideline for what
to bring. Highlight those items you need to buy. You may
decide to buy some items at a department store near the
college rather than buying and transporting them from home.
If money is tight, consider shopping at summer garage
sales.

*Invest in a set of bed elevators (approximately $15) to
create instant storage space under the bed for seasonal
bedding and clothes, shoes, extra school supplies, or an
inflatable air mattress for overnight guests. Bed elevators
are a convenient alternative to cement blocks, which many
students use for this purpose. Look for this product at
stores like Bed, Bath & Beyond (www.bedbathandbeyond.com)
and Organize-Everything (www.organize-everything.com).

*For under-the-bed storage, any large, lidded plastic
container will do, but for easy access to stored goods,
look for under-bed storage boxes with hinged lids and
wheels. Vacuum-seal storage bags are an excellent space-
saving alternative to boxes assuming, of course, that your
student has a vacuum cleaner with a hose attachment. Check
out the Hoover Fold Away (www.hoover.com). It’s a full size
vacuum cleaner that folds down to a portable size for easy
storage and there are no bags to change!

*Double hanging space in a closet with a second rod that
hangs below the existing rod. Use the backs of doors for
things like an over-the-door rack with hooks for hanging
bathrobe, towels, laundry bag or for an over-the door shoe
bag.

*Use sturdy, stackable crates for transporting items; then
use the crates to create storage bookshelves, a TV or
stereo stand, or even a seat.

*Don’t forget the little things like zippered plastic bags
(great for storing open food and for pre-measuring laundry
soap powder); non-adhesive shelf liner like the ones from
Duck Products (www.duckproducts.com); poster putty for
hanging/re-hanging posters and photos without marring
walls; and a “care” package of room cleaning supplies,
paper towels, and sponges.

*Of course, you can’t let your student leave home without
some cash. AOL (www.aol.com) is getting ready to introduce
a prepaid card that allows parents and students up-to-the-
minute online access to account balances plus the ability
to monitor how and where money is being spent. AOL’s cash
card will be part of its 9.0 Optimized Version due out
later this summer.

*Another new product that’s worth a look is the TI-83 Plus
calculator (http://education.ti.com) from Texas
Instruments. It’s one of the most powerful graphing
calculators on the market today and it comes pre-loaded
with an electronic calendar, address book and task list.
So students can track assignments and due dates, plus keep
track of their active social lives. This handy little
device from Texas Instruments can even serve as an
organizational study tool with an electronic flash card
application. Students can test themselves on various
subjects including foreign languages, vocabulary,
geography, history and more. Cool.

***********************************************************
ENTER TO WIN an autographed copy of my most recent book!

Do you have a question about uncluttering or organizing?
Or a really great organizing tip that you would like to
share with other readers? Send an e-mail to me at
donna@unclutter.com with “Readers_Write” in the subject
line. (NOTE: Please do not “Reply” to this message as I
will not receive your e-mail.)

If your question or tip is used in a future issue of this
newsletter, I will send you a free autographed copy of my
latest book, Organizing Plain & Simple
(www.unclutter.com/books.html)!

Congratulations to this month’s winner, Pam S. of Cohocton,
NY for her question about how to cope with being
overwhelmed with clutter and a spouse who is “working at
cross-purposes.”

***********************************************************
That’s it for this month. Until next month, keep it simple.

***********************************************************